dating a guy who has a kid - 16 dating 20 legal

Under the directions and supervision of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Operation Paperclip recruited Nazi scientists who had a broad skill-set, ranging from rocketry to torture.[1] Using the newly gathered intelligence, the United States Navy started Project Chatter and the CIA started Project Artichoke, both of which studied the effects of drugs for the purposes of interrogation.[1] The CIA’s project used hypnosis, forced morphine addiction, and the use of other chemicals and methods.[2] On April 13, 1953, Project MK-Ultra was officially approved.[3][4] MK-Ultra initially began its human experimentation on CIA employees and military personnel, but soon began to include prostitutes, the mentally ill, and abducted American & Canadian citizens.[1][3][4] Operating under the umbrella of Project MK-Ultra, Operation Midnight Climax consisted of a web of CIA-run safe houses in San Francisco, Marin, and New York.[4][5] Prostitutes on the CIA payroll were paid to lure clients to these safe houses, where the men would be drugged and monitored behind one way glass.[4][5] This method of experimentation was desired because the victims, when released, would be too embarrassed to discuss the events.

In 1962, the use of these safe houses were significantly scaled back following the recommendation of CIA Inspector General John Earman.[5] With the CIA safe houses no longer in operation, human experimentation under MK-Ultra continued in Canada under the supervision of psychiatrist Donald Ewen Cameron, who previously served on the medical tribunal at the Nuremberg trials in the late 1940’s.[1][4] From 1957-1964, Cameron was paid ,000 by the CIA to conduct experiments at the Allan Memorial Institute of Mc Gill University in Quebec.[1] It was here that the most disturbing experiments took place, which included heavy doses of LSD and electroshock therapy at 30-40 times the normal power.[6] Subjects were also intentionally placed in comas, where recordings of noise or simple statements would be played on a loop for periods of time ranging from several weeks up to three months.[6] When awakened, the patients were severely and often permanently damaged.

However, according to the Department of Justice’s “Emerging Issues on Privatized Prisons” report, private prisons offer at best a 1% cost savings over their government operated counterparts, while at the same time having 49% more assaults on staff and 65% more assaults on other inmates.[11] Corporations owning correctional facilities is not the only way that prisons and the War on Drugs have been used as a source of income.

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of America spent $970,000[7] and GEO Group spent $660,000[8] lobbying Congress in 2010 alone. of America’s Feb 2011 press release, CEO Damon Hininger stated, “..are pleased our populations have remained strong, in excess of the 80,000 inmate milestone we surpassed late in 2010.”[9] With the 3.2% increase in inmate population over the previous year, Corrections Corp.

of America was able to make $511.26M profit, earning their CEO over $3,000,000 in compensation.[9][10] Private prison proponents claim that private corporations are able to provide the same service more efficiently than the government.

News Corp., now infamous for the News International phone hacking scandal in the UK[13], owns Fox, My Network TV and other stations totaling some 27 television stations in the United States alone, with Fox Television Stations reaching over 35% of American television homes with six duopolies in the top 10 television markets.[14] Fox International owns 120 channels around the globe while News Corp. Then comes Time Warner, the largest media conglomerate[17] with the second highest revenue behind Disney, both of which have holdings which far exceed the space here[17] and include a wide variety of industries including monopolies on cable service in some locations.[20] As with many of the other powerful media groups, Time Warner Inc.

also owns production and distribution companies like Fox Home Entertainment, 20th Century Fox Television, Fox Film Entertainment, Fox Searchlight Pictures, Blue Sky Studios, Fox 2000 Pictures and more on an international scale. was formed with the merger of Warner Communications, Inc., Time Inc., and Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.[19] and now encompasses a plethora of properties in television, the Internet (like AOL, CNN, TMZ, People.com, Moviefone, Advertising.com, and more), film, publishing (including comic books and more than 150 magazines) along with marketing companies as well.

In New York, inmates refusing work assignments have been known to be placed in solitary confinement for 23 hours a day until work is resumed.[20] At the same time, it is illegal to import products made using prison labor into the United States.[21] Just six corporations[1] own the vast majority of media outlets in the United States.

Through years of relentless mergers, acquisitions and consolidations, a handful of corporations have been able to dominate most of what Americans read, see and hear on a daily basis.

General Electric (GE) owns a 49% stake in NBC-Universal[15] and NBC Networks (includes NBC News, NBC Sports, NBC Television, NBC Universal, CNBC, CNBC World (Arabia, India, Asia, Europe), MSNBC, Bravo, Sy Fy Channel, Telemundo, USA, Oxygen and more) along with 46 NBC affiliate stations and more stations internationally. Viacom owns a massive amount of television properties including MTV Networks (and the many variants including MTV Networks International which operates in 160 nations), BET Networks, CMT, Comedy Central, Logo, Nickelodeon, Spike TV, TV Land, and VH1.[20] They also control several film production companies under Paramount Pictures Corporation and a massive internet presence.

In the realm of film production and distribution, GE owns Universal Pictures, Focus Features, and Rogue Pictures with production agreements with more companies and distribution through Universal Studios Home Entertainment. CBS Network consists of 30 stations and a 50% share of the CW Network, the other 50% belonging to Time Warner along with 130 radio stations, major book publishers like Simon & Shuster, prominent online holdings, CBS Outdoor and more.[22] The case against increased media conglomeration is a strong one[22] with countless supporting factors, although many individuals seem to come to this conclusion naturally when seeing how the vast majority of the media they are exposed to come from just a few corporations, all of which have close relationships with each other.

However, despite the Department of Defense not being required to purchase its products, many defense contractors take advantage of the cheap labor offered by prisons.[18] For example, inmates make as little as 23 cents an hour manufacturing components used in Patriot missiles, which then sell for .9 million apiece.

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