Avid microchip updating information

The resulting video, especially when it is complex or changing quickly, may sometimes contain visual flaws, depending on the processing quality and amount of compression.

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DVD-ROM includes recordable variations: DVD-R/RW, DVD-RAM, and DVD R/RW (see 4.3).

The application formats include DVD-Video, DVD-Video Recording (DVD-VR), DVD RW Video Recording (DVD VR), DVD-Audio Recording (DVD-AR), DVD-Audio (DVD-A), and Super Audio CD (SACD).

Video from DVD sometimes contains visible artifacts such as color banding, blurriness, blockiness, fuzzy dots, shimmering, missing detail, and even effects such as a face that "floats" behind the rest of the moving picture.

It's important to understand that the term "artifact" refers to anything that is not supposed to be in the picture.

Artifacts are sometimes caused by poor MPEG encoding, but artifacts are more often caused by a poorly adjusted TV, bad cables, electrical interference, sloppy digital noise reduction, improper picture enhancement, poor film-to-video transfer, film grain, player faults, disc read errors, and so on.

Most DVDs exhibit few visible MPEG compression artifacts on a properly configured system..

With this unprecedented support, DVD became the most successful consumer electronics product of all time in less than three years of its introduction.

In 2007, ten years after launch, there were over one billion DVD playback devices worldwide, counting DVD players, DVD PCs, and DVD game consoles.

Pointers to other DVD sites are scattered throughout the FAQ and in section 6.4.

The DVD FAQ is written by Jim Taylor, the author of DVD Demystified, Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About DVD, and Blu-ray Disc Demystified.

DVD is vastly superior to consumer videotape and generally better than laserdisc (see 2.7.).

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